Baby Yoda Santa Hat – Free Pattern

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Yep, I adopted one of those cute Baby Yodas. To earn his keep, I decided he needed to perform an additional function (other than taking up space with his cuteness), namely as a Christmas decoration.

baby yoda santa hat

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This Santa Hat fits snugly on Baby Yoda’s head and even has holes in the brim to accomodate his oversized, lime-green alien ears. I figure he appreciates it, he is bald and my house is fairly cold in the winter.

Maybe yours needs one too?

Baby Yoda Santa Hat Pattern

.pdf download at end of post

Materials

  • Size US13 long circular needles for Magic Loop or double-pointed needles
  • 20 yards super bulky furry yarn, white or desired color. I used Lion Brand Go For Faux.
  • 20 yards super bulky red yarn. I used Lion Brand Hometown USA
  • Tapestry needle for weaving in ends.

Abbreviations

  • K – Knit
  • K2tog – Knit 2 together
  • Kfb – Knit front and back
  • st(s) – Stitch(es)

back of baby yoda's head and santa hat

Method

Using furry yarn, cast on 36 stitches. Join for working in the round.

Rounds 1-2: Knit to end of round.

Round 3: K5, *K1, pass second stitch on right needle over first one. Repeat from * 5 more times, for a total of 6 stitches bound off. K16. *K1, pass second stitch on right needle over first one. Repeat from * 5 more times, for a total of 6 stitches bound off. K3.

Round 4: K4. Using Cable Cast-On, cast on 7 stitches. K1, pass the last cast-on stitch over that K stitch. K15. Using cable Cable Cast-On, cast on 7 stitches. K1, pass the last cast-on stitch over that K stitch. K3. (36 sts)

Round 5: K to end of round.

Cut yarn, leaving a tail to weave in later. Attach red yarn.

Rounds 1-2: Knit to end of round.

Round 3: *K4, K2tog. Repeat from * to end of round. (30 sts)

Rounds 4-5: K to end of round.

Round 6: *K3, K2tog. Repeat from * to end of round. (24 sts)

Rounds 7-8: K to end of round.

Round 9: *K2, K2tog. Repeat from * to end of round. (18 sts)

Rounds 10-11: K to end of round.

Round 12: *K1, K2tog. Repeat from * to end of round. (12 sts)

Round 13: *K2tog. Repeat from * to end of round. (6 sts)

Break yarn and thread through live stitches to close top.

For the pom, using size 13 needles and the furry yarn, I cast on 3 stitches, then joined for knitting in the round. (I kept my long tail inside the pom for stuffing.)

Round 1: *Kfb. Repeat from * to end of round (6 stitches).

Round 2: K around.

Round 3: *K1, Kfb. Repeat from * to end of round. (9 stitches)

Round 4: K to end of round.

Stuff pom if desired.  Cut yarn, leaving a tail and thread through live stitches to close pom.

Use tail to sew pom onto top of hat. Weave in ends.

Slide one of BY’s ears into an ear hole, then gently stretch the other hole over his other ear. Remember, the beginning of the knitting rounds are the back of the hat, so if it fits funky, try turning it around.

Click here for a downloadable .pdf.

If you find any problems or errors in the instructions, please let me know!

That’s it! Enjoy.

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Clan of Two – Free Knitting Pattern

I’ve got a free knitting pattern for all you Star Wars/Mandalorian fans. Clan of Two is worked from the bottom up and includes a corrugated rib cuff and thumb gusset.

Clan of Two knitted mittens

The Mudhorn signet was granted to our hero by the Armorer in the final episode of the first season of The Mandalorian, after she declares Dyn Jarren and Baby Yoda a “clan of two.”

I used US1.5 needles with a gauge of 9 stitches/inch, which made the mittens about 7 inches in circumference. If you need them a bit larger, use size US2 needles with a gauge of 8 stitches/inch.

The pattern has only been tested by me, so feel free to contact me with any questions or errors.

Enjoy!

Download here: ClanOfTwo

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Knitting (Or Crocheting) Stuff Your Kids Actually Want to Wear

One day last week, I was browsing the yarn section at Ben Franklin. My daughter, G,  approached me with an armful of bright green and yellow acrylic yarn and asked me to knit her a sweater. I replied with “Who are you, and what have you done with my daughter?”

Knitting for Kids

I think many of us begin knitting because we want to make cute, one-of-a-kind, handmade items for our babies. Adorable booties. Endearing little baby sweaters.

I began knitting long beyond the kids’ baby stages, but I still enjoy creating hand knit items for them. Especially for my tween daughter. The problem is that she doesn’t appreciate wearing these items quite as much as I enjoy making them for her.

I’ve knitted several items for G, like this top and this sweater, only to have them end up at the bottom of the dresser drawer or passed on to a cousin. And forget about having her try them on during the production process. It’s like trying to squeeze a pissed-off cat into a pair of Barbie pants.

Which is why I about fell over from shock when she asked me to knit for her.

Chara

Knit chara sweater for kids

The yarn is Cherub Aran by Cascade Yarns, a soft and squishy blend of nylon and acrylic. The bright neon colors made me wonder if G was trolling me into making an ugly sweater. However, it turns out that she wanted to assume the image of the character Chara from the video game “Undertale.” Yeah, I’d never heard of it either. At any rate, it should make a great cosplay for next year’s ComicCon.

After obtaining the details from my daughter and the internet (wide yellow stripe, set-in-sleeves, rounded neck, etc.) I pondered my construction method. I knew I wanted to knit it top-down.

My first attempt involved Barbara Walker’s top-down simultaneous set-in sleeve method. It was a disaster. (It was me, not the method.) I frogged it. I tried Susie Myers’ Contiguous Sleeve Method next. This worked out much better. I loosely followed Isabell Kraemer’s Driftwood pattern (without the button placket), for sizing and construction.

kids knitting chara sweater
Nothing like knitting on the beach!

Knitting something that kids want

I finished the Chara sweater. G loves it. Now I have a plan to follow when I want to make another item for her.

    1. Let her pick out the project.

I would never have made this sweater. Or picked out this yarn. This was all G’s idea.

2.  Let her pick out the yarn.

Even if it’s neon and bulky and acrylic and not the natural-colored sock weight wool I usually like to work with. Come to think of it,  I suppose I should be thankful that she didn’t pick out a sock weight wool for this project.

3. Let her be involved in the design process.

G gave me all the details on how she wanted it from the sleeve type (set-in) to where exactly the stripe goes. At one point I had to frog back because the stripe was too low.

4. Make it fun.

This wasn’t just any old sweater. And G actually enjoyed trying this on as I was knitting it.

Despite not being something I would normally make, I had fun with this project. The yarn was nice to work with. The pattern was easy to follow. The colors almost burned my eyes out. But G will actually wear this. And the big grin on her face as she helped with it made it all worth it.

I can’t promise I won’t design anything else for her that she has no desire to wear.

At which point, I’ll be back trying to squeeze the aforementioned cat into the tiny doll clothes.